High intensity interval training does have a role in risk reduction or treatment of disease

To av løperne på "Kung Sture" tester kondisen på NextMove kjernefasilitet før St. Olavsloppet. Foto: CERG/Andrea Hegdahl TiltnesThis week the Journal of Physiology published a CrossTalk-series with the topic:  High intensity interval training does have a role in risk reduction or treatment of disease.

Traditionally the effect of exercise training and physical activity on risk of diseases and on their treatment has been studied mostly at low to moderate exercise intensities. However, during the last 15 years a growing body of evidence has suggested that exercise at high intensity may be superior low to moderate intensities in terms of treatment effects of such diseases and risk reduction. Ulrik Wisløff and Øivind Rognmo from K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, together with Jeff Coombes from University of Queensland, argue for the use of high intensity exercise in this respect. You can read the CrossTalk at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1113/JP271041/abstract

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About CERG

The Cardiac Exercise Research Group (CERG) at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) seeks to identify the key mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of physical on cardiac health in the context of disease prevention and treatment. Named the K.G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine under Professor Ulrik Wisløff's leadership in 2011, CERG uses both top-down and bottom-up approaches to combat lifestyle-related disease.

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