I exercise because it never cease to amaze me how far I can push my own limits

Winner of Advent calender December 3rd“I exercise because it never cease to amaze me how far I can push my own limits (the limits I may think I have!), and to experience the feeling of mastery everytime I reach the goals I have set for myselv. Even when climbing to the top of Holmenkollen after #toughestrace:)”

@annemjelva, winner December 3rd

Share your reason along with a picture under the hashtag #CERGxmas on Instagram to join in. If you have a private Instagram profile, you can upload your photo to our International Facebookpage.

Follow us on Instagram as CERG_ntnu, Twitter as CERG_ntnu and on our International Facebookpage

People from all over the world can participate and win. Read more about the prizes and the rules here!

“Exercise makes me feel amazing”

Winner of Advent Calendar 1. december Photo: @henriruul“Exercise makes me feel amazing. A great way to catch up with friends, challenge each other and share the passion for sport”

@henriruul, winner of our Advent calendar December 1th

Share your reason along with a picture under the hashtag #CERGxmas on Instagram to join in. If you have a private Instagram profile, you can upload your photo to our International Facebookpage.

Follow us on Instagram as CERG_ntnu, Twitter as CERG_ntnu and on our International Facebookpage

People from all over the world can participate and win. Read more about the prizes and the rules here!

Exercise to take care of his heart

Roar Strand

“I exercise to keep in shape for my slightly younger and very beautiful wife! And because I want to take care of my heart and my health

Roar Strand, former soccer player

Share your reason along with a picture under the hashtag #CERGxmas on Instagram to join in. Every day from the 1st-24th of December we will draw a winner who gets an exercise towel and drawstring bag. On Christmas Eve we announce the main winner who wins a dream day at CERG. Read more about the prizes and the rules here!

Follow us on Instagram CERG_ntnu, Twitter CERG_ntnu and Facebook!

– Exercise gives me energy

Kent Roger Tangvik. Foto Matti Pedersen

“My two main reasons for exercising are. Firstly, I would like to spend as much time of my life as possible with my children. To be able to do that, I need to take good care of myself, and at the same time serve as a healthy role model for them integrating sports and play into their childhood upbringing. Secondly, exercise gives me energy, balance and cam. I simply function better when I exercise”

Kent Roger Tangvik, participant in the TV show “71 grader nord”

 

Share your reason along with a picture under the hashtag #CERGxmas on Instagram to join in. Every day from the 1st-24th of December we will draw a winner who gets an exercise towel and drawstring bag. On Christmas Eve we announce the main winner who wins a dream day at CERG. Read more about the prizes and the rules here!

Follow us on Instagram CERG_ntnu, Twitter CERG_ntnu and Facebook!

 

Why do you exercise? Tell us and join our advent calendar!

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There are millions of reasons to exercise. Everyone has their own, and they vary over time. What is your reason?

Inspired by the campaign #30for30 #reasontoexercise by Exercise & Sports Science Australia (ESSA) throughout November, we want to hear why you exercise in this year’s advent calendar on CERG.

Share your reason along with a picture under the hashtag #CERGxmas on Instagram to join in. If you have a private Instagram profile, you can upload your photo to our International Facebookpage.

Follow us on Instagram as CERG_ntnu, Twitter as CERG_ntnu and on our International Facebookpage

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Tried our 7 week exercise program?

Foto: iStockLes dette innlegget på norsk her!

Then Brita Helleborg wants to get in touch with you. She tried our fitness calculator a while back. She is 60 years and got exactly that as her fitness age. Yet she was not completely satisfied.

“I was disappointed, I thought I was in better shape than the average. I tested the calculator by adding various answers to the questions, and found out that what was needed to reduce the fitness age was high intensity workoutHellborg says.

Read Britas blog and got in touch with her here! (It is written in Norwegian, but she wants to get in touch with people from all over the world who has tried our 7 week program)

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How to be active in your busy life?

CERG på Geeky treningsøkt med Girl Geek Dinners TrondheimLes dette innlegget på norsk her!

There is no doubt about the fact that physical activity is good for you. Despite convincing evidences that physical activity and exercise is beneficial for your health, physical inactivity is today the 4th leading risk factor for global mortality.

Health organizations around the world are making a concerted effort to encourage the general population to start exercising or to increase the time spent exercising, while less attention have been paid to what we do the rest of the day. Time spent sitting is found to be a dependent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, type2-diabetes and several types of cancer. As discussed in a previous blog post, a study from a British research group found that more than seven hours a day sitting increased the risk for developing cardiovascular disease by 147%,  increased the risk for developing diabetes by 112%, and even the participants who exercised regularly had a 49% increased risk of dying prematurely.

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“Exercise snacks” before meals reduce blood sugar spikes

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Short bouts of high intensity exercise before breakfast, lunch and dinner helps control blood sugar levels in people with insulin resistance more effectively than one session of 30 min moderate intensity training according to a study recently published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes).1 The researchers have found that these “exercise snacks” before meals reduce blood sugar spikes after meals.

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Why is it so hard to lose weight only with exercise?

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joggeturSummer is almost over, and many people are trying to find the motivation to exercise more and get a healthier lifestyle. If the motivation to start exercising again after summer is to lose weight, the risk is big for you to be disappointed. Let’s just say it out loud: you will not lose weight only by exercising. To be more specific, you need to exercise MUCH if you are going to train your weight away.

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Should we avoid exercise in hot weather?

A colleague here at CERG spoke to me before she went on holiday and expressed concern about a running race in Denmark she would be competing in where temperatures could be up to 28º. The Met Office in Britain issuing a heatwave health warning with recent forecast temperatures of 28º to 32º over two days. These stories are hilarious to Australians like me, who have experienced temperatures like this continually for 4-5 months of the year, and have survived and continued to train through events like the March 2008 Adelaide heatwave where maximum temperatures were above 37.8º for 13 consecutive days. But should I be laughing? 300 mostly infant and elderly Britons died as a result of a 32º heatwave in 2009. And now, acclimatised to living in Norway and with a warm summer by Norwegian standards currently upon us, I do find myself struggling a little bit exercising in these conditions that I used to find so mild. Why is it so hard to exercise in the heat and what can we do to acclimatise and improve performance under these conditions?

Photo: iStock

Read also: How to deal with extremely hot weather?

Temperature regulation is critically important for a normally functioning body, and the body has a number of mechanisms to tightly maintain body temperature between 36.5º and 37.5º. If those mechanisms are overwhelmed and body temperature increases beyond these levels, heat exhaustion or even potentially deadly heat stroke symptoms begin to arise. Two of the main mechanisms we use to keep cool in hot conditions are sweating, and arteriolar vasodilation. Arteriolar vasodilation is the widening of blood vessels, which allows increased blood flow to the skin and extremities, allowing more heat to be lost by convection and conduction. The heart must work harder to supply that blood flow to the skin, and at maximal exercise intensities a compromise must be reached between maintaining blood supply to active muscles, and blood supply to the skin to lose heat, which is one of the main reasons for a reduction in exercise performance. These reductions in performance can also be accompanied by central fatigue as a result of heat sensitive neurological changes, and symptoms of dehydration as a result of increased sweating.

Read also: What is the energy cost of falling into cold water?

Of course, there are many commonsense things that we can do to either avoid the heat, or to minimize its effects, and still enjoy training or competing outside in warm conditions. For example, training early in the morning or later in the evening to avoid the hottest parts of the day, making sure that we drink enough, and wearing less clothes, and using tightly fitted sports clothes helps to increase evaporative cooling by sweating can all help you avoid heat exhaustion.

However, by exposing ourselves to heat, we can actually acclimatise to warm conditions and improve exercise performance. Adaptation to heat can occur over days to weeks of living in a hotter environment. Physiological changes occur to improve heat tolerance such as a reduction of heat production from fat and increases in sweating. Training in hot conditions has been found to give significant increases in athletic performances, and is now often used by elite athletes to give them an edge even if competing at normal temperatures. As an example, submaximal training of competitive cyclists in 40º heat for 90 minutes every day for 10 days was found to give an increase of 8 percent VO2max compared to the a 5 percent increase in the exact same training in 13º conditions. Subjects who had trained in the heat performed better 8 percent better in the heat, and 6 percent better in cool conditions in a time trial test, and had a higher lactate threshold than those who had trained in cool conditions.

While we should be aware of our limits and careful to avoid the negative effects of heat exhaustion, dehydration and sun overexposure, there are benefits to be had from training in warm conditions. Another reason to enjoy the fine sunny weather!

Nathan Scrimgeour, Senior engineer at CERG