Nature’s Need To Move – By Mike “Shark Man” Rutzen

Great white sharks, like humans, need an active and stimulating lifestyle. If restrained they simply cannot thrive. Ideally, we can offer an environment when man and shark can coexist, and this amazing animal can continue to hunt, migrate and reproduce in the wild.

Mike Rutzen dives uprotected with great white shark. This Friday, he comes to Norway to tell about it – and why we need to protect these animals in the wild.

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A positive mindset makes exercise feel less strenuous

Studies have shown perception, when it comes to exertion during exercise, can influence long-term motivation and participation in an exercise program. In other words, if you think that exercise is hard, you are less likely to stick to it. Continue reading

Bouldering-have you tried it yet?

Everyone agrees that if something is fun, it is easier to do. Also, everyone knows that being active is good for your health. However, there is still a high prevalence of physical inactivity worldwide. Common reasons for not being physically active include the lack of time, or motivation and energy to exercise. Also, many assume that physical activity should be in form of gym-workouts or organized exercises, and leading to exhaustion. Continue reading

“Fitness” foods unfit for waistline?

We have all tried to control our body weight at some time or another. We do so by watching what and how much we eat and by regulating our activity level, thus addressing both sides of the energy balance equation.  To adhere to this lifestyle, we may seek out foods that fit with our goals. Continue reading

Exercise in pregnancy: most women can do more than they think!

Similar to early parenting, pregnancy is a period characterized by an ocean of contradicting advice from family, friends, as well as health professionals and media.
Particularly confusing is the information regarding physical activity. Continue reading

Tabata hit at CERG

Tabata training is a very popular high intensity training protocol consisting of 20 seconds of all out effort, followed up by 10 second rest for a total of 4 minutes.  Tabata training shares the name with it’s inventor, Dr. Izumi Tabata, whom we had the pleasure of hosting at CERG today.

From left: Silvana Bucher sandbakk, Ulrik Wisløff, Izumi Tabata and Øivind Rognmo

The concept of Tabata training was first entertained in 1984 in Norway, where Dr. Tabata was studying physiology along with Mr. Irisawa, a coach of the Japanese speed skating team.  The Tabata training protocol was first invented by Mr. Irisawa and was subsequently tested in the lab and established by Dr. Tabata. This protocol has been shown to deliver impressive improvements in fitness.

Tabata training is very simple to implement.  One can do it with a single movement (such as burpies), varying movements, or while running on a treadmill or cycling. Whichever way one chooses to exercise, the Tabata workout provides an effective full body anaerobic and anaerobic workout.  However, the Tabata-style workouts are very intense and their appropriateness should be assessed on individual basis.

Nina Zisko, Researcher at CERG